The Sun is Huge... ...NOT!

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[CoFR]BooBoo

FNG / Fresh Meat
Jan 12, 2006
706
0
0
Tarzana, CA, USA
www.cofr.net
In terms of stars and their sizes, our own Sun is a piddling little dust mote. There are far, far more giant stars that ones the size of ours. Stars that make our solar system look tiny by comparison.

Many of my nights are spent under the stars looking through the eyepiece of my 8" Newtonian reflector. When I look at something like M51 (Whirlpool Galaxy) and consider what I'm truly seeing, a galaxy composed of many billions of suns, our place in the vast universe takes on an entirely different perspective. Our little system of Sun and plantes is but the tiniest grain of sand on a nearly infinite beach.

I suggest you watch Carl Sagan's Cosmos if you want a new perspective on the human race, Earth, and our Sun.
 

Ralfst3r

FNG / Fresh Meat
Nov 21, 2005
3,043
293
0
37
The Netherlands
In terms of stars and their sizes, our own Sun is a piddling little dust mote. There are far, far more giant stars that ones the size of ours. Stars that make our solar system look tiny by comparison.

Many of my nights are spent under the stars looking through the eyepiece of my 8" Newtonian reflector. When I look at something like M51 (Whirlpool Galaxy) and consider what I'm truly seeing, a galaxy composed of many billions of suns, our place in the vast universe takes on an entirely different perspective. Our little system of Sun and plantes is but the tiniest grain of sand on a nearly infinite beach.

I suggest you watch Carl Sagan's Cosmos if you want a new perspective on the human race, Earth, and our Sun.

Nice suggestion. I just watched it, and i really liked it.

Carl Sagan's The Origins Of The Universe:

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShJwq3aPLMk&mode=related&search=

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxQR6gdd1P0&mode=related&search=
 
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