92 points in Finland biggest Gaming oriented magazine!

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Tak

FNG / Fresh Meat
Jan 10, 2006
1,855
96
0
East Coast, USA
Nice review :) Can't wait till it ships and some more Euro players start kicking around on the servers.


As for Finnish being easy....lawls. I've yet to hear a language come from further north or east than Germany that can be defined as 'easy' to native English speakers :p
 

Oldih

Glorious IS-2 Comrade
Nov 22, 2005
3,418
412
0
Finland
As for Finnish being easy....lawls. I've yet to hear a language come from further north or east than Germany that can be defined as 'easy' to native English speakers

[OFFTOPIC]

According to my info, finnish is the 2nd hardest language ever to learn, 1st place is held by arabian language.

[/OFFTOPIC]


Who was it reviewed by?

Someone from the staff of the Pelit- magazine, nothing special on that.
 

Xerxis

FNG / Fresh Meat
May 5, 2006
3
0
0
NY, Queens
=GG= Mr Moe said:
92 - Excellent! :)

I should ditch my PC Gamer (US) and buy that mag and learn the language.

I am still pissed off at PC Gamer's 74 (and I wrote them so) .... BOOOOOOOO! :mad:

well 74 isnt a bad score for PC Gamer, and the article did praise the game quite a bit, its just that the guy who reviewed it, Dan Stapleton, (I kinda got this impression by listening to the podcast of PC Gamer) makes some pretty harsh criticisms of some games, but not in a bad way. But this is based on his personal opinion so this has to be respected to some degree. I would also like to add that I started playing the game a week ago two days after I got the magazine and read the article.
 

Xendance

FNG / Fresh Meat
Nov 21, 2005
4,484
572
0
31
Elitist Prick Club RS Branch
Oldih said:
[OFFTOPIC]

According to my info, finnish is the 2nd hardest language ever to learn, 1st place is held by arabian language.

[/OFFTOPIC]




Someone from the staff of the Pelit- magazine, nothing special on that.

And I thought swedish is impossible to learn o_O
 

Diamond

FNG / Fresh Meat
Apr 17, 2006
260
0
0
Netherlands
I send a mail to Holland's biggest gaming magazine, requesting them to review it. I also send them the link to the list of reviews and the trailer (1st one).
I hope I get a mail back and that they actually review it. *crosses fingers*
 

aesdana

FNG / Fresh Meat
Apr 18, 2006
1,068
204
0
ssa
myzko said:
Swedish has got to be the easiest language to learn, that's why it's so crowded with people coming from war countries :( (But we put them into ghetto's instead of Society so it's not that terrible)

Unfortunatly that is so true... :(
 

Raptus

FNG / Fresh Meat
Feb 21, 2006
90
0
0
32
Finland
Well, learning swedish is mandatory in finnish schools. Altough I never really learn't it. Thank god I don't have to study it anymore. No offence to you swedes. :)

I'd like to know too who reviewed it. Honkala?
 

Xendance

FNG / Fresh Meat
Nov 21, 2005
4,484
572
0
31
Elitist Prick Club RS Branch
Swedish words are too hard to remember. Some of them are like some english words but meaning is completely differend. And because of that I don't need swedish anywhere I usually forget everything.
Only thing I remember is "
 

MkH^

FNG / Fresh Meat
Mar 11, 2006
500
0
0
Finland
Oldih said:
Someone from the staff of the Pelit- magazine, nothing special on that.

I was just thinking if it was Niko Nirvi by any chance. Would make the magazine worth buying. Honkala is not very good with words in my opinion.
 

Vonreuter

FNG / Fresh Meat
Apr 3, 2006
280
7
0
Finnish is a Finno-Ugric language and has absolutely nothing to do with Mongolian or Mayan languages! Finnish is a descendant of Uralic languages, similarly like English is a descendant of languages spoken along the Indus river some millenia ago.

Furthermore, Finnish is not a Slavic language. This is for those, who thought that Uralic means Russia. Slavic languages have different roots and are in no relation to the Finno-Ugric language tree.

While Hungarian is a relative to Finnish, it is a very distant one. Indeed, the language family is split into two different trees: the Fenno family, including Finnish and the Baltic-Finnic Estonian, and the Ugric family, consisting of the Hungarian language and some dying or extinct languages like Khanty. These languages were split apart from each other some 5000 years ago. Thus, modern Hungarian and Finnish are very far from each other, and despite their distant relation, Finns cannot understand Hungarian any more than the Germans or the English can understand Indian languages (which are related to German and English and share the Indo-European language tree).
 

Tomcat_ha

FNG / Fresh Meat
Nov 21, 2005
3,283
185
0
32
Vonreuter said:
Finnish is a Finno-Ugric language and has absolutely nothing to do with Mongolian or Mayan languages! Finnish is a descendant of Uralic languages, similarly like English is a descendant of languages spoken along the Indus river some millenia ago.

Furthermore, Finnish is not a Slavic language. This is for those, who thought that Uralic means Russia. Slavic languages have different roots and are in no relation to the Finno-Ugric language tree.

While Hungarian is a relative to Finnish, it is a very distant one. Indeed, the language family is split into two different trees: the Fenno family, including Finnish and the Baltic-Finnic Estonian, and the Ugric family, consisting of the Hungarian language and some dying or extinct languages like Khanty. These languages were split apart from each other some 5000 years ago. Thus, modern Hungarian and Finnish are very far from each other, and despite their distant relation, Finns cannot understand Hungarian any more than the Germans or the English can understand Indian languages (which are related to German and English and share the Indo-European language tree).


Finnish has the same grammar system as Turkish. Only thing is different are the words. Finnish words even sound slightly turkish.
 

Centar

FNG / Fresh Meat
Apr 2, 2006
220
0
0
Finland
I've now translated the thing.

To the red square and back

Red Orchestra, that begun as a popular multiplayer mod runs now independently and wholly upgraded. The spirit of the game is still near simulation-like realism. One thing hasn't changed: single player is still only practe against bots. If difficulty isn't an issue, Red Orchestra is the best multiplayer fun in a long time.

German companionship

It's the last days of April in 1945. The Red army has came through the gates of Berlin and is reaching for the Reichstag, the last center of resistance. The last German heroes seek to prevent the advance: random people gathered from the navy, panzer divisions, a few voluntaries and a tank. The war has been lost already, but the last positions are held as a matter of principle. A real man doesn't surrender.

An officer tries to get the recruits up and attacking from the ditch they are hiding in, but recieves a dead-on hit from a grenade. When the bodyparts fly a few meters into the air, the recruits are heading to their homes. Mistake. The Red Army machineguns take an aim on the fleeing and light them up with green tracers. The lights of a christmas tree take me into a my childhood: I was six years old and had just recieved a wooden horse from the santa. I often played with it until the morning, dreaming of a job in the German army.

I came back to the reality, as I heard a desperate shout from the ruins: "Achtung, Panzer!". A Russian IS-2 tank rises easily on a nearby hill and begins to destroy our positions. Some try to destroy it with potato smashers and small arms, but they can't even dent it's armor. Now is my chance to earn an iron cross. I crawl to a nearby ammo crate and pick up a few panzerfausts. I estimate the distance to be about 30 meters and take a shot at the IS-2.

There's no explosion, just a pling. The munition only bounced off of the armor. The turret of the tank begins to turn towards my hideout, and in panic I shoot again with my second panzerfaust. This time I hit better, and the soviet tank ignites in flames. But I only hit it's engine: the best is stopped, but it's still dangerous. I thought that my iron cross changes into a cross, but then as a gift from the Heaven, a 88mm munition appears from far away and destroys the Soviet pride. The German Tiger tamed the Siberian bear, and Berlin is rescued from communism (for about five minutes).

Heroes of the eastern front

It's not any more calm in the other maps. Whether fighting in the ruins of Stalingrad or in the fields of Hungary, the lead flies at you at short intervals. Every one of the 13 maps feels different, because the equipment is changing. In the smaller urban maps there are only a few tanks, if that, but in the widest fighting grounds there can be a dozen of tanks. In the tank maps the distances are kilometers, which is a solid achievement on the gaming engine. The views change, but the objectives remain the same. Victory is achieved either by destroying the enemy forces, or by capturing all the map's strategic locations, like factories and villages.

The map determines the available classes. Both the Germans and the Soviets have indefinite riflemen, but for example only a couple of snipers and commanders. The battles feel much more real, when every enemy you encounter isn't carrying a machinegun. As the war goes on, the classes recieve new armaments. The old bolt action rifles change into semiautomatics and new submachinegun models become available. You can still use the old models, if you want to remember the good old times.

Retreat

The difficulty level of Red Orchestra is high. No ammo meters or other insignifigancies decorate the screen, and your teammates aren't identified by magical arrows but by their uniforms. In the beginning, a lot of accidents happen, as it's nearly impossible to tell if far away characters are friends or foes. Even the crosshair has been dumbed and while shooting you must use the weapon's iron sights, at least if you mean to hit something. When shooting from the hip, the bullets impact far from the target.

The battles require tactics. If you stay out in the open for just a moment, you're caught in a hail of lead. The only working way of advancing is to move from cover to cover as the machineguns keep the enemies down. Covering fire actually helps, because nearby impacts will cover one's field of view in fog and disturb the aiming. You have to fear every bullet, because often only one is enough. And even if you don't die immediately, you're stunned for a moment, or you drop your weapon, which isn't fun in a war.

The feel of the weapons is spot on. Automatic weapons have the appropriate kick, preventing the use of all-out bursts. The rifles are deadly powerful, but slow. Realism is at such a scale that the player has to remove the empty casings from the chamber himself by moving the bolt back. At first, you never remember it, but soon it'll become a reflex. But the guns can't put a bullet through a wooden fence, which badly cuts down the believability.

The Tiger roars

Tanks are realistic. You can deal out a lot of destruction with them, but on the other hand, they can easily be destroyed by scatchel charges or by a launcher, if you get close enough. You can only really see forward from the cockpit, so you can't do a thing about attacks from the sides or from the rear. You can look out of the hatch, but then you get a bullet into your forehead.

To get the most out of the tanks, you need a crew of at least two. You can get them moving when alone, but then you can't shoot and move at the same time. When fighting other tanks, the driver has to work too, because your own thing must be constantly moved to better locations. When the driver does his thing, the commander's job is to estimate the range and to shoot the enemy.

The damage modeling of the tanks is simulation quality. The engine, tracks and ammo locations can be blown up by aiming at the appropriate locations. The angles are taken into account, so shots fired from certain angles bounce off

into the sky without causing any damage. It creates many exciting situations, when you never know will the next one rip through the metal or not.

Classical orchestra

Red Orchestra's leader Tripwire won the Make Something Unreal competition with their Red Orchestra mod. The prize was the highly expensive lisence for the Unreal game engine. Therefore Tripwire changed into a game developing firm whose first project was the completely stand alone version of Red Orchestra. And it's not a port over, but nearly everything including the graphics and the sounds has been re-made. The ageing 2.5 version of Unreal shows in the character graphics, but you don't really have the time to pay attention to those in the middle of the fighting. The audio, which is so important to a war game, is played particularly well by the Red Orchestra. Artillery barrages come down everywhere and the small arms rattle. There aren't any quiet moments.

What is most important are the big maps, and that's what they have plenty of. Unfortunately a server can only fit 32 players. Some lonely hideouts where you can't see anyone else can be found in some of the tank maps.

The game's handfull of small faults are nothing in comparison to the only one that cannot be fixed by patches: the stupidity of your fellow players. You're screwed if none of your friends realises to capture the objectives. You can't take them alone, and you can't win rounds by camping. Teamwork flows better with familiar gaming company, but [teamwork] is only seen rarely and then it's a great pleasure.

Red Orchestra can currently only be bought in Valve's Steam online service for about a twenty. If you have a credit card, Red Orchestra is a great buy for a realism freak. Red Orchestra proves that the Second World War is still in, if it's properly done.

Good:
- Amazing atmosphere.
- The right amount of realism.
- Damage modeling works.
- Cheap.

Bad:
- Graphics could be better.
- Weapons have no penetration capabilities.
- Single player is only a botmatch.

World War shooters have a new king.

PELIT MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS
92 pts

(Above article was written by Samu Ollila. Only the crappy translation here is by me. Full credit to him)

Thanks to Moskari for providing me with what to translate :)

The article has many pictures, showing off the tracer effects ("Unfair, soviets have laser guns!"), explosion concussion effects, tank sights, close combat, iron sights, supporting the gun on objects, etc. Overall its a very nice article though it has some faults (eg. as we now know grenades do damage tanks and the damage model is broken etc) but no major flaws. First and foremost, it's guaranteed to give a solid boost to the sales at a national scale at least.

I tried to post this earlier but somehow it didn't get through... :confused: well here it is now.
 
Last edited:

Vonreuter

FNG / Fresh Meat
Apr 3, 2006
280
7
0
Care to elaborate, Tomcat? I'm a linguist by profession, and I would be very interested in how you'd base your opinion.

Both Finnish and Turkish (like Hungarian) do have vowel harmony which may create the similar "sound" that you're describing. However, that is no proof of close relation (indeed, Estonian, a Baltic-Finnic language, lacks vowel harmony).

The statement that Finnish and Turkish have "the same grammar" is utter nonsense. Even the very basic things, like word order, differ. The Turkish word order is Subjective, Objective, Verb, whereas in Finnish it is Subjective, Verb, Objective, just like in English, for example.

Turkish belongs to the Ural-Altaic family, which derives from the same source as the Uralic Hungarian language (which is, admittedly, a distant relative of Finno-Ugric languages). However, Turkish and Finnish are far more distant relatives than Russian and English (which are indeed related! - both Slavic and Germanic languages share the Indo-European language tree).
 

Centar

FNG / Fresh Meat
Apr 2, 2006
220
0
0
Finland
You're right. I'm a born Finn and Finnish is my first language. There is no relation between Finnish and Turkish (they can still sound somewhat similar in some aspects). There is a strong link between Finnish and Estonian, and a much more distant relation between Hungarian and Finnish.

Anyhow, check out that article :)